Construction & Turf Equipment Specialists

what's happening

Waukegan - Kubota Field Day
One of our biggest annual sales event, coming to our Waukegan location 5/19/2022
Joliet - Kubota Field Day
One of our biggest annual sales event, coming to our Joliet location 5/5/2022
Big Sidekick Savings
$0 Down, 0% A.P.R. for 48 Months or Save $1,000
Kubota Z400 Zero Turn Mowers
$0 Down, 0% A.P.R. for 36 Months or save $300 on new Z400 series mowers.
Save on Select Compact Tractors
$0 Down, 0% A.P.R. for up to 60 months PLUS save up to $1,100

our products

At Burris Equipment Company, we only offer the highest quality products and services to our customers. We offer a wide range of expertise that is sure to meet all of your equipment needs.
Construction Equipment
Turf/Golf Equipment
Used Equipment
Rental
Service
Parts

recent news

11
Mar
Best Practices: How to Maintain Trench Safety?

How to Maintain Trench Safety?   Working in and around trenches is a regular part of many construction and utility projects. It’s so common that crew members can sometimes forget that working near trenches can be dangerous if the right precautions aren’t taken. The good news is that most jobsite accidents involving trenches can be easily avoided. Follow this guide to help prevent dangerous, costly situations on your next excavation job.   Common trenching hazards   Insufficient safety precautions surrounding trenches can lead to problems on your jobsite. Some examples of potentially dangerous consequences of not monitoring trench areas sufficiently are: ·         Slips and falls into the trench ·         Cave-ins and collapse of the trench walls ·         Heavy equipment sliding into the trench ·         Flying rocks and other debris from above the trench ·         Nearby structures collapsing into the excavated area ·         Striking underground utilities, resulting in gas leaks, electrocution, flooding, or explosions Below are tips and best practices that will help you avoid hazardous conditions surrounding trenches.   Trench safety tips 1.      Install protective systems – When your trench is deeper than 5 feet, protective systems are required. One way to accomplish this is through sloping and benching, which involves cutting back the trench wall at an angle to create a slope, then developing steps to travel in and out of the trench. The other way is by using shoring and trench shields. These systems use metal supports for the trench walls to help prevent cave-ins. 2.      Routinely inspect your trenches – All trenches should be carefully checked before work begins for the day and then rechecked several times throughout the shift to look for signs of collapse or any other dangerous conditions. Signs of danger include cracking, sagging, or bulging of the trench walls or bubbling on the floor of the trench. If it is raining or snowing, then trenches should be inspected even more often. 3.      Have an OSHA Competent Person on the job – A Competent Person is responsible for noticing and identifying potential hazards on the jobsite, as well as taking necessary steps to maintain safety. This role is required on every job by OSHA regulations. 4.      Ensure your crew is well trained and uses proper protection – All excavation workers should be able to identify and respond to potential trenching threats, and they must wear the proper personal protective equipment (PPE) at all times, like hard hats, eye protection, and long sleeves and pants. 5.      Know your jobsite – Underground utility lines can be hazardous to construction workers. It’s important to know if there are any gas, electricity, or water lines running through your work area. Their locations should be identified and clearly marked for the excavation crew. 6.      There needs to be a way out – Any trench more than 4 feet deep must have simple access and egress routes within 25 feet of every worker. These routes may be ladders, ramps, or stairs. 7.      Keep a safe distance – All workers should keep a safe distance from excavators digging a trench, in order to avoid injury from falling loads or debris. You should also keep supplies, equipment, and excavated materials stored at least two feet away from the trenching edge to avoid the possibility of having them fall into the trench. 8.      Test for dangerous substances – Trenches must be tested for oxygen levels as well as potentially toxic gases like methane and carbon dioxide. Safety First  Trench safety is important to avoid injuries and downtime on the job. You can help prevent accidents and maximize the efficiency of your project by understanding and implementing these tips and best practices for working in and around trenches.

19
Jan
Best Practices: Equipment End of Life

What Can You Do with End of Life Equipment?   To ensure optimal performance on the job, you sometimes need to get rid of even your most trusted and longest serving heavy equipment. No matter how well you take care of and maintain your machines, they will eventually deteriorate with regular use. To minimize unexpected breakdowns, you must replace end of life equipment before the risk of failure becomes too high. The question is, what can you do with your old machines when it comes time to part ways? You don’t want them sitting around taking up valuable space or degrading even further if they still have some value to offer you. Below are the four primary options for properly disposing of end of life equipment.   Sell it Just because your operation is ready to stop using a piece of equipment doesn’t mean that there isn’t someone who can use it. If it is still in usable condition, you can try selling the machine directly to a buyer. The drawback to this end of life equipment disposal method is that it can take a lot of time and effort to sell directly to a buyer. You have to act as a sales rep in addition to running your operation. The other option is to contact your dealer or manufacturer and see if they are interested in purchasing it.   Trade it in Some equipment dealers (Burris Equipment Co. included) or manufacturers will gladly accept your old machine as a trade in. This route is easier than selling, because they are used to refurbishing or remanufacturing old equipment, then reselling it. Plus, most dealers and manufacturers have an established process for reselling used equipment. While this option could help you save money on new a new machines, what you receive for your equipment will depend on what the dealer or manufacturer estimates is a fair trade in value.   Recycle or scrap it  Recycling or scrapping may be your only option if your end of life equipment is well beyond restoration and cannot be sold or traded in due to its poor condition. Although you won’t receive as much money as you would if you were selling a machine in better condition, scrap and recycling centers may help you recoup a small amount, and it is certainly a better option than leaving it to rot on your lot or behind your shop.   Auction it If your end of life equipment is a popular model or for some reason is in high demand, then auctions can be a great alternative to selling to a dealer, even if the machine is in poor condition. Auctioning old equipment using online bidding sites requires less effort than direct selling and also broadens your reach to an extensive list of potential buyers.   Final notes  Old equipment does not need to sit idle and take up wasted space in your facility. There are ways to dispose of it while potentially recouping some of your costs. Whether you have one machine reaching its end of life or several, the options we listed will help you determine the best approach to disposing of any equipment that is no longer useful in your operations.

7
Dec
Introducing OAT Coolant

New Organic Acid Engine Coolant Technology OAT coolant is required for new CASE Tier 4b engines with ≥ 56 kW emissions. Use OAT coolant to avoid the risk of serious engine damage through overheating. About OAT Coolant ACTIFULL™ OT EXTENDED-LIFE COOLANT is CASE's OAT coolant Supplemental Coolant Additives (SCA) are not necessary with OAT coolant that meets MAT 3624 It's yellow in color When should you use OAT? All new CASE Tier 4b vehicles with Flat Power Train (FPT) engines that are in the ≥ 56 kW emissions category require OAT coolant Look for one of the ACTIFULL™ OT decals shown before you add or change the coolant OAT Coolant Part Numbers Case Akcela ACTIFULL OT® extended life coolant concentrate 1 GAL - 73341735 55 GAL - 73341736 Case Akcela ACTIFULL OT® extended life coolant premix 1 GAL - 73341738 2.5 GAL - 73341739 Best Practices for OAT Coolant Never Mix OAT with Regular Coolant Mixing coolants can cause a loss of stability in the corrosion inhibitor, cavitation erosion, and gelling damage. This type of damage is not covered by your warranty, and repairs can cost thousands of dollars. Adding as little as 10% of regular coolant in an OAT system is enough to cause damage to your machine. Look for the OAT decal before adding or changing coolant to ensure you don't mix coolants and cause gelling inadvertently. Selecting Coolants Do not risk using OAT coolants from other manufacturers, unless they specifically meet CASE's MAT3624 material requirements. Use the ATSM number, not the coolant color, for reference when selecting your coolant. Mixing OAT with Water Mix half OAT and half water ratio, which will protect cooling systems to -35° F (-37° C). Only use de-ionized water with OAT coolant. Tap, hard, softened or sea water will reduce the coolant life and can cause deposits to form, creating hot spots and cavitational corrosion. Avoid Machine Damage Do not use anti corrosive additives in an OAT cooling system. Although these additives are commonly used in ethylene glycol fluids, they can cause premature wear in your machine. Only use machines with chemical resistant hosing. OAT coolant will react with PVC, rubber and Viton seals, creating leaks over time. Note: Use of OAT is not recommended for older machines. If you choose to run OAT in an older application, the cooling system must be flushed. The nitrate level must not be higher than 20 ppm. Oil Requirements Engine oil requirements may have changed, too, due to Tier IV emissions technologies. Low-ash CJ-4 oil is required for machines with DPF Non-DPF machines can run either CI-4 or low-ash CJ-4 oil There is no industry standard for CJ-4 oil additives. Don't risk premature engine wear by using oil that is not formulated for your machine.

newsletter signup

Please fill in the form below to receive our periodic newsletter and get special offers emailed directly to you.