Burris Equipment

Construction & Turf Equipment Specialists

IMPORTANT NOTICE: Effective 5/18/20, we are allowing limited access to all our facilities . What this means is, we will be restricting access to our stores to a max of 10 customers at a time . However, you must wear a face mask and you must practice 6 ft safe distancing when in our facilities. We are providing hand sanitizing stations in the stores and if you don’t have a mask let us know and we will provide you with a disposable mask. We will also be sanitizing high touch areas; including counters, work surfaces and signature devices continually. In addition, if you prefer, we are still offering curb side pickup of all equipment, parts, rentals and repairs at each location.

what's happening

Kubota Fall Buyer's Guide
Great deals on everything you need for the fall season!
Kage Innovations
We are now a Kage Innovations dealer!
Jacobsen Financing Special
Jacobsen products with no interest and no payment until January 2021.*
COVID-19 Announcement
Effective 5/18, we are now allowing limited customer access to our showrooms as well as curbside pickup or delivery.
Online Parts Ordering
We are very excited to announce that we have just released a new version of our online parts ordering application!

our products

At Burris Equipment Company, we only offer the highest quality products and services to our customers. We offer a wide range of expertise that is sure to meet all of your equipment needs.
Construction Equipment
Turf/Golf Equipment
Used Equipment
Rental
Service
Parts

recent news

23
Nov
Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) Tips

When to refill the tank On Case equipment, there is a DEF gauge, just like the fuel gauge. It shows the fluid level and indicates when it’s time to refill. When fluid level becomes low in the DEF tank, a series of warnings will alert the operator after DEF reaches less than 10% of capacity. If the DEF tank contains less than 5% of its capacity, the equipment engine power will de-rate. Enough power will be available, however, to travel a short distance, so you can add DEF to the tank. The DEF tank needs to be filled once every 3 to 4 times that you refuel with diesel fuel in Case machines. The frequency will vary with operating conditions. How to fill the tank The opening of the DEF tank is sized to accept only a DEF fill nozzle. This constraint ensures that only DEF can be pumped into the DEF tank. A standard nozzle for diesel fuel will not fit into the DEF tank opening. DEF tanks will hold between 15 and 50 gallons, depending on the equipment size and horsepower. About DEF Composition Diesel Exhaust Fluid (DEF) is non-toxic and is made up of purified water and urea. It is stable and colorless. DEF is similar to baking soda in its alkalinity (pH). It is not a fuel but is used to reduce the level of nitrogen oxides in the emissions to meet emissions control standards. Purpose In the Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) system, DEF is injected into the exhaust. It converts the NOx into nitrogen gas and water vapor, which are harmless components of air. Storing Keep DEF out of direct sunlight. The ideal temperature range for storing DEF is 32° F to 86° F, and its average shelf life is 3 years. DEF begins freezing at 32° F. The DEF tank on the vehicle has a heater that will thaw the DEF quickly. Freezing and thawing does not change its effectiveness. Because of its alkalinity, it can cause oxidization in the same way that oxygen rusts raw steel, so it needs to be stored in plastic or stainless steel containers. Burris Equipment also offers a complete line of DEF transfer pumps and meters, including on-site bulk storage equipment options. All Case DEF meets ISO Standards for purity and composition and is an American Petroleum Institute (API) certified diesel exhaust fluid. These standards are the highest for quality and safety and ensure optimum SCR system performance.

26
Oct
Maintenance for Skid Steer Tires

A few simple maintenance routines can extend the life of your skid steer tires dramatically. Clean your Tires Hose down your tires routinely so they are easy to inspect. Look for bubbles, bumps, cracks, and anything that might be lodged in the rubber. Check the Tread A quick visual inspection will also reveal any uneven wear. On skid steers, one set of tires may wear faster (the front or rear), depending on how they are operated. Rotate the tires as soon as you notice any uneven wear, which will extend the life of all four tires. Operate with All Four Tires Engaged There is less wear on the tires and the machine when the skid steer is operated with all four tires engaged on the ground. When the bucket is too far beneath a load, the front tires may lift slightly off the ground, placing stress on the back tires. Keep the Tires on the Ground Skid steer tires are designed for operation on ground, not on road surfaces. Consequently, the tires will wear out faster when they are driven on roads rather than on the ground. Watch for Debris Skid steers are operating in areas that are often full of debris. Drive carefully and avoid litter. Pneumatic tires can go flat, and foam-filled tires can leak if punctured. Protect the Rims Avoid popping off retaining rims, which can occur by catching the rim on an object. It’s inexpensive to replace a rim, but the downtime associated with unnecessary maintenance can be quite expensive. Look for tires with rim protectors built into the design. Monitor the Pressure With pneumatic tires, if the tire pressure is too low, you will waste fuel, and if it’s too high, you increase the chance of flats. In either case, uneven wear can result. Keep a reliable tire gauge handy and check the pressure every day or once a week, depending on how often you are operating the skid steer. Check your owner’s manual for the acceptable tire pressure range. Store Properly Constant exposure to sunlight can cause tires to expand and crack. Store tires in a cool, dry place. Buy Consistent Brands Avoid installing different brands or models of tires on the same machine. Each brand has its own distinct design and combining brands can cause uneven wear on both your tires and your skid steer.

5
Aug
Track Tension: Best Practices

Adjusting Tension Improper tension Loose tracks can detrack. Over-tightening can cause power loss, excessive roller and idler wear, and could tear the tracks. Refer to your operator's manual for track inspection and tensioning procedures. How to adjust Track tension is controlled by a track adjuster located behind the front idler. Tension adjustments are made by pumping or draining grease through the track adjuster valve. Even small adjustments in track sag have a big impact on tension. A change in sag from 1'' to 0.5'' increases tension by about 3,000 pounds. Refer to your operator's manual for specific information on how to adjust the track tension of your machine. Inspect adjuster valve periodically Make sure your adjuster valve is working properly by visually inspecting it periodically. If the valve shows signs of leakage, bring your machine in for repair as soon as possible. Leakage can lead to a loss of track tension and increased wear. Match Tension to Operating conditions Adjust track tension on-site Make tension adjustments on the job site rather than in the shop. Track tension may increase if the sprocket and chain are packed with mud or other materials. A track that is properly tensioned in the shop may become too tight when packed with mud. Test packing conditions before adjusting To match track tension with the specific packing conditions of the job site, run your machine for a short while on the job site, then make the necessary adjustments. Make frequent adjustments Changes in weather can alter the packing conditions of the job site throughout the day. Making tension adjustments in response to these changes can help reduce track wear and costs. Do not operate your machine if the tracks are frozen Wait for the weather to improve if your tracks become frozen. If you try to use power to force the tracks to move you might destroy them. Operation Avoid abrupt turns and high speeds Do not make abrupt turns, because they place unnecessary stress on the track and undercarriage. Continuous turning to the same side can cause asymmetrical wear. Higher speeds cause more wear on the undercarriage. Use the slowest possible operating speed for the job. Avoid excessive reverse operation Do not operate in reverse unless necessary. Reverse operation wears tracks up to three times as quickly as forward operation. Highspeed reverse is particularly destructive to tracks and undercarriage components. Inspection Have your undercarriage inspected annually by a trained technician to catch problems early before they lead to unnecessary damage. For questions or additional information, please contact the branch nearest you.

newsletter signup

Please fill in the form below to receive our periodic newsletter and get special offers emailed directly to you.